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Posts Tagged ‘NFL’

Why Olympic Football Needs to Happen

In Football on February 5, 2014 at 1:16 pm

With the Winter Olympics set to begin on Thursday, CDH has the games on the mind. But we’re not thinking bobsled — we’re thinking football. Today, Ian Brickey takes a closer look at the possibility of American football as an Olympic sport.

Will an Olympic gold medal rival a Super Bowl championship as the top achievement in football? It could happen sooner than you think.

The International Federation of American Football received provisional recognition from the International Olympic Committee in a Dec. 10 vote. Fox Sports’ Alex Marvez reported that the IOC could vote as soon as 2017 to approve football as a full-fledged Olympic event, with competition beginning at the 2024 Summer Games.

Olympic-Logo

The IOC cited football’s international growth in popularity as the rationale for the decision. The IFAF currently features 64 member countries and offers three versions of the game: tackle, flag and beach. Football was previously featured as a demonstration program at the 1904 and 1932 Summer Games. Read the rest of this entry »

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Manufacturing Points

In Football on January 8, 2014 at 4:06 pm

Frequent flier miles with your season tickets? It could happen if Ian Brickey’s economic development plan went through.

If you’ve followed St. Louis media at all in the last few weeks, you’re probably aware of the effort to land (wow, what a pun) Boeing’s 777X passenger jet manufacturing contract. With labor unrest in Washington — Boeing’s manufacturing hub — both city and state leaders sought to entice the aerospace behemoth to the Show-Me State.

After weeks of closed-door meetings and negotiations, the state and the city each offered tax concessions of nearly $1.8 billion a piece for Boeing to build a new factory in St. Louis County. But those efforts were not, as machinists in Washington approved a new labor deal Saturday ensuring the work would stay in Seattle.

With St. Louis’s bid effectively over, I can now reveal my own part in the Boeing bonanza. You see, a few weeks ago, I got a call from Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon. It was a surprise to say the least. Jerry — I call him Jerry — and I haven’t spoken in a while.

“Ian,” he says, “I want you in on the Boeing thing.” Read the rest of this entry »

Stadium ad nauseum

In Baseball, Sports Philosophy on July 11, 2013 at 4:12 pm

Sports stadiums can be things of beauty. But they can also be architecturally unpleasing, outdated or utterly insane. CDH’s Ian Brickey looks at six of the craziest stadium designs ever proposed by American professional sports teams.

The primary function of an athletic stadium is to host sporting events. In that regard, all stadiums are similar. But similarity does not mean all stadiums are the same. There’s a reason we lament the destruction of Ebbets Field and the Polo Grounds more than half a century after their demolitions and not, say, Veterans Stadium (although the sightlines for battery-throwing were unparalleled). The difference is architecture. Stadiums can be beautiful buildings — even works of art. But they can also be architectural atrocities. American sports teams have considered a lot of stadium design proposals over the years. Here are six of the craziest. Read the rest of this entry »

Team on the Run

In Baseball, Football on July 8, 2013 at 2:31 pm

Can you imagine the New England Patriots ditching Boston for greener pastures, or the Philadelphia Eagles playing in the desert? CDH’s Ian Brickey looks at six franchise relocations that almost occurred.

It’s hard to imagine your favorite sports franchise moving to a different city. Fans tend to blend civic identity with sports success, to the point where teams become synonymous with the city. But those connections that seem so permanent one minute can quickly be undone, and the next minute, you’re redeeming your season tickets in a different time zone — just ask fans of the Baltimore Colts, Brooklyn Dodgers and Los Angeles Rams.

As painful as they can be, many team relocations have come to define the modern leagues, and reinvigorated languishing franchises. It’s difficult to imagine Atlanta without the Braves, Pittsburgh without the Steelers or Detroit without the Red Wings. But for every successful relocation, there are multiple proposed moves. Here are six franchise moves that almost happened. Read the rest of this entry »

Big Trouble Right Here in River City

In Football on February 16, 2013 at 4:41 pm

The St. Louis Rams want a new stadium. Here’s why St. Louis shouldn’t pay for it.

There’s a quote from the film Gladiator that says, “The beating heart of Rome is not the marble of the senate, it’s the sand of the Colosseum.” It conjures images of grand architecture, exciting battles and the splendor of one of the world’s great cities. Now, try and substitute “St. Louis” for Rome and “Edward Jones Dome” for Colosseum. The picture changes: bland architecture, bad football and an unappealing airport connection. Doesn’t really have the same impact, does it?

Most people would agree that the Edward Jones Dome, home of the Super Bowl XXXIV Champion St. Louis Rams,[1] needs to be renovated, and it’s not hard to see why. The sightlines are terrible, the seats are cramped, the scoreboard is tiny, the sound system vacillates between inaudible and jumbo jet exhaust, and the ambient light is practically non-existent. The Edward Jones Dome is like the cave you visited that one time as an elementary schooler, except there’s beer and you paid $200 to get in. Unfortunately for the denizens of St. Louis, they might be on the hook for a lot more than a new scoreboard. Read the rest of this entry »

Super Bowl Recovery

In Football on February 7, 2013 at 6:03 pm

CDH’s Sam Sutton’s San Francisco 49ers lost on Sunday, but that doesn’t mean he has to like it.

Dear Jack,

Things got pretty emo on Sunday night.

Not Dashboard Confessional emo, but definitely Neil Young circa “After the Gold Rush” emo. You may not realize this about me, but behind the obnoxious 49er snapback and super sick red Adidas hoodie, there beats the heart of a deeply sensitive young man [VOMIT].

That heart was broken Sunday night. As were the hearts of thousands — nay, millions — of Bay Area sports fans. Our hearts were broken by the cold realization that, although the San Francisco 49ers had a better team on paper, the Baltimore Ravens were in fact the better team on the field [more VOMIT]. Read the rest of this entry »

Ray Lewis

In Football, Long form on January 3, 2013 at 1:16 pm

Ray Lewis’s playing career could end Sunday. Crim Del Harris examines Lewis’s accomplishments, shortcomings and his legacy in Baltimore.

Ray Lewis will likely play his last game in Baltimore Sunday. The locals will rush to claim him as one of their own, a native son of Baltimore. They are wrong. Ray Lewis, the greatest middle linebacker of the 21st century, was never Baltimore. He was a greatness that knows no geographical boundaries. Ravens fans never cheered for Lewis because he represented the spirit of a city. They cheered for him because they never got to cheer for Tom Brady. They cheered for him because it was better than cheering for Corey Dillon.

In truth, many fans had stopped cheering lately. Sunday’s game against the Indianapolis Colts will likely set decibel records in Baltimore that will mask an inglorious end to Lewis’s playing career. Two steps slow and seemingly forever behind in coverage, the linebacker often resembled a rooted oak conspicuously decaying in the modern NFL. Read the rest of this entry »

The Third Man(ning)

In Football on February 8, 2012 at 9:04 am

In the weeks leading up to Super Bowl XLVI, the staff at Crim Del Harris talked about putting together a crowdsourcing game analysis. The result would be a thoughtful and engaging analysis of football’s biggest game, and would raise the level of discourse on this site to heretofore unknown levels. But then we remembered that none of us like the Patriots, and at least one of us is openly hostile to the Giants and their fans, so it never materialized. [Code for we never got around to it.] So instead, here’s our collective text message exchanges from the game — 1,000 words of pure, unadulterated CDH snark. Enjoy.

Read the rest of this entry »

Peyton Place

In Football on February 4, 2012 at 11:36 am

Crim Del Harris concludes its three part Super Bowl Extravaganza with a journey deep into the human psyche, where the lines between man and Manning vanish and football civilization recedes with every chop block. Read part I here, part II here and part II 1/2 here

I’d been six days since leaving the exact center of the world. At least it was the exact center of the world on the evening of February 5. By this time, Indianapolis, Indiana had likely retreated to the provincial midwest backwater that typically spent its winters enthralled in the bucolic purity of high school hoops. I was no longer in basketball country; the swampy darkness of the Louisiana night, still as the alligators that patrol its murky waters, is ruled by a much different god.

Read the rest of this entry »

CDH Super Bowl Extravaganza Pt. II 1/2

In Football on February 3, 2012 at 5:14 pm

Part II 1/2 of our Crim Del Harris Super Bowl Extravaganza. Check out Part I here, and then read Part II here. We have top men working on Part III. Top. Men.

[Somewhere, off the coast of Amity Island…]

HOOPER: You played at Indianapolis?
CHIEF BRODY: What happened?
QUINT: New England offense slammed two tight ends into our end zone, Chief. We was comin’ off a high in San Francisco…just won the conference championship. NFC championship. Patriots were 3.5-point favorites. Giants don’t score in the first 12 minutes.

Read the rest of this entry »

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