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Archive for the ‘Football’ Category

Why Olympic Football Needs to Happen

In Football on February 5, 2014 at 1:16 pm

With the Winter Olympics set to begin on Thursday, CDH has the games on the mind. But we’re not thinking bobsled — we’re thinking football. Today, Ian Brickey takes a closer look at the possibility of American football as an Olympic sport.

Will an Olympic gold medal rival a Super Bowl championship as the top achievement in football? It could happen sooner than you think.

The International Federation of American Football received provisional recognition from the International Olympic Committee in a Dec. 10 vote. Fox Sports’ Alex Marvez reported that the IOC could vote as soon as 2017 to approve football as a full-fledged Olympic event, with competition beginning at the 2024 Summer Games.

Olympic-Logo

The IOC cited football’s international growth in popularity as the rationale for the decision. The IFAF currently features 64 member countries and offers three versions of the game: tackle, flag and beach. Football was previously featured as a demonstration program at the 1904 and 1932 Summer Games. Read the rest of this entry »

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Reading Time, Five Minutes

In Baseball, Basketball, Football on February 1, 2014 at 8:11 pm

Crim Del Harris’s weekend update of the week’s top sports stories. 

Jeff Goldblum has a great line in the 1984 film The Big Chill that all bloggers should take to heart. Talking about his dead-end job at People, Goldblum’s “Michael” discusses the magazine’s one editorial rule: “You can’t write anything longer than the average person can read during the average crap.” It’s with that sentiment in mind that CDH debuts an irregularly recurring feature — Reading Time, Five Minutes. Borrowed from the St. Louis Post-Dispatch’s Bernie Miklasz, RTFM will give you a run down of the big stories in sports, with some witty comments and a funny Vine, or something. We haven’t quite figured it out yet. Anyway, let’s begin!

Earlier this week Major League Baseball Commissioner Bud Selig announced the league’s actions to protect pitchers from line drives. Beginning in spring training later this month, pitchers will have the option of wearing a cap with extra padding around the cranium to protect against head trauma and brain injury. While the league’s effort to protect players is admirable, these caps look…pretty terrible. [Cue Great Gazoo joke.] Read the rest of this entry »

Manufacturing Points

In Football on January 8, 2014 at 4:06 pm

Frequent flier miles with your season tickets? It could happen if Ian Brickey’s economic development plan went through.

If you’ve followed St. Louis media at all in the last few weeks, you’re probably aware of the effort to land (wow, what a pun) Boeing’s 777X passenger jet manufacturing contract. With labor unrest in Washington — Boeing’s manufacturing hub — both city and state leaders sought to entice the aerospace behemoth to the Show-Me State.

After weeks of closed-door meetings and negotiations, the state and the city each offered tax concessions of nearly $1.8 billion a piece for Boeing to build a new factory in St. Louis County. But those efforts were not, as machinists in Washington approved a new labor deal Saturday ensuring the work would stay in Seattle.

With St. Louis’s bid effectively over, I can now reveal my own part in the Boeing bonanza. You see, a few weeks ago, I got a call from Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon. It was a surprise to say the least. Jerry — I call him Jerry — and I haven’t spoken in a while.

“Ian,” he says, “I want you in on the Boeing thing.” Read the rest of this entry »

In the Emperor’s Shadow

In Football, William & Mary on September 25, 2013 at 2:04 pm

After back-to-back losing seasons, it looked as if Jimmye Laycock’s time as head football coach of the William and Mary Tribe was coming to an end. But reports of Laycock’s demise were greatly exaggerated. With a 3-1 record — the only blemish, a near-upset of West Virginia — the Tribe are off to their best start since 2010, a season that ended in a Colonial Athletic Association championship for the College. After the Tribe’s second round loss to Georgia Southern, CDH’s Jack Lambert wrote a retrospective on Laycock’s tenure at the College.

Originally published Dec. 3, 2010 in The Flat Hat— 

“We came in and played very, very well. We came to play, and once we started playing, we didn’t stop. We played it all the way out.”
— Jimmye Laycock after the Tribe’s Nov. 20 win against Richmond.

Is that it, you wonder? After thirty years as a head coach, are those the only words Jimmye Laycock has left? Vague, empty words? Read the rest of this entry »

SEC Blues

In Football on September 6, 2013 at 8:31 pm

CDH Editor Ian Brickey was at the Missouri Tigers’ home opener against the Murray State Racers. Mizzou won the game 58-14. This is what he remembers.

By and large, college students hate mornings. Mornings on college campuses are supposed to be reserved for two kinds of people: suckers who got the late jump on class registration and people skulking around in what they wore the night before. But Mizzou is different. If it’s possible, Mizzou almost feels more alive during the early morning. So I shouldn’t have been surprised when I woke up Saturday to a text that said, “Wake the f— up and get ready.”

Football is kind of a big deal at Mizzou. And since the Tigers joined the Southeastern Conference in 2012, that football culture has only increased. It doesn’t matter that the Tigers aren’t expected to do anything in the conference this year. Saturday home games are high holy days in Columbia, Mo., and must be treated accordingly. This includes tailgates, alumni events and parties. I went to William and Mary, and I was unprepared for this. At William and Mary, tailgating was what sad old crones did out of the trunks of a few Camrys before heading back to the Washington, D.C. suburbs. With a bit of luck, the game was over before before your freshman hallmate’s band performed awful Carbon Leaf covers at Homebrew.

So, when my friend invited me to attend the Tigers opening game of the 2013 season against the Murray State Racers, I jumped at the opportunity. Read the rest of this entry »

Team on the Run

In Baseball, Football on July 8, 2013 at 2:31 pm

Can you imagine the New England Patriots ditching Boston for greener pastures, or the Philadelphia Eagles playing in the desert? CDH’s Ian Brickey looks at six franchise relocations that almost occurred.

It’s hard to imagine your favorite sports franchise moving to a different city. Fans tend to blend civic identity with sports success, to the point where teams become synonymous with the city. But those connections that seem so permanent one minute can quickly be undone, and the next minute, you’re redeeming your season tickets in a different time zone — just ask fans of the Baltimore Colts, Brooklyn Dodgers and Los Angeles Rams.

As painful as they can be, many team relocations have come to define the modern leagues, and reinvigorated languishing franchises. It’s difficult to imagine Atlanta without the Braves, Pittsburgh without the Steelers or Detroit without the Red Wings. But for every successful relocation, there are multiple proposed moves. Here are six franchise moves that almost happened. Read the rest of this entry »

CAAtastrophy

In Basketball, Football, William & Mary on March 27, 2013 at 1:14 pm

This week, George Mason University announced its plans to leave the CAA in July. William and Mary needs to plan.

Terry Driscoll’s office is probably like any other office. I’m sure the College of William and Mary’s athletic director has a large desk and some chairs for visitors. He probably has a nice view of the College’s campus, and dozens of photos chronicling his 12-year tenure as William and Mary’s AD. While I’m sure Driscoll likes his office just the way it is, he needs to make an addition. On the wall, directly in front of his desk chair, the athletic director needs to hang a framed print of a quote from Oakland Athletics general manager Billy Beane. It should be large, it should be stark, and it should be put into action.

At some point, we need to move on. We need to start doing some things. That day is fast approaching, if it’s not here already. Our prom dress has been on for over [a] year, and we’ve been standing there, with a corsage, waiting.[1]

George Mason University announced this week that it would join the Atlantic 10 Conference for all sports beginning July 1, 2013, severing its ties to the conference that the Patriots helped found in 1979. The move was unsurprising, but that didn’t lessen any of the sting felt by the fans and administrations of the Colonial Athletic Association’s remaining schools

For the low price of $14.99, you can be the proud owner of this portrait of Terry Driscoll.

For the low price of $14.99, you can be the proud owner of this portrait of Terry Driscoll.

Read the rest of this entry »

The Semantics of Steubenville

In Culture, Football on March 19, 2013 at 5:40 pm

The Steubenville rape case has received national attention and significant media coverage as an example of the cult of high school sports. But have we missed the real narrative?

Two teenage boys in Steubenville, Ohio were convicted Sunday of raping a teenage girl.

You’ve heard this story already? I’ll bet it was introduced to you a little differently:

Washington Post: “Two members of Steubenville’s celebrated high school football team were found guilty Sunday of raping a drunken 16-year-old girl…”  

Ohio Plain Dealer: “On trial in Jefferson County Juvenile Court are two Steubenville High School football players accused of raping a 16-year girl…”

NBC: “Two Ohio high school football players have been found guilty of raping a drunken 16-year-old girl…”

CNN: “Two star football players in Steubenville, Ohio, have been found guilty of raping a West Virginia teenager.”

You see, it wasn’t just any pair of young men found guilty of rape. It was a pair of football players. Star football players. Promising young athletes. Hometown heroes.

If you’re wondering why that’s relevant, why media coverage is being framed in that context, you’re not the only one. Why on earth does it matter what extracurricular activity the perpetrators preferred? Read the rest of this entry »

Tribe Choices: The Search For An Offensive Coordinator

In Football, William & Mary on February 25, 2013 at 4:35 pm

It’s almost March, and the William and Mary Tribe is still without an offensive coordinator. What’s causing the delay? The answer might surprise you.

The search for the College of William and Mary’s new offensive coordinator is taking longer than expected. CDH has learned that the delay is due to the rigorous multiple choice exam head coach Jimmye Laycock is putting candidates through. Luckily, we have obtained a copy of this questionnaire. Do you have what it takes to be William and Mary’s next offensive coordinator? Answer these questions and find out.

1. If hired, you will spend most of your time:

a) Recruiting Tidewater Virginia.

b) Explaining the appeal of colonial re-enactors to indifferent recruits.

c) Finding out which sorority girls are especially full of “Tribe Pride.”

d) At Paul’s. Read the rest of this entry »

Big Trouble Right Here in River City

In Football on February 16, 2013 at 4:41 pm

The St. Louis Rams want a new stadium. Here’s why St. Louis shouldn’t pay for it.

There’s a quote from the film Gladiator that says, “The beating heart of Rome is not the marble of the senate, it’s the sand of the Colosseum.” It conjures images of grand architecture, exciting battles and the splendor of one of the world’s great cities. Now, try and substitute “St. Louis” for Rome and “Edward Jones Dome” for Colosseum. The picture changes: bland architecture, bad football and an unappealing airport connection. Doesn’t really have the same impact, does it?

Most people would agree that the Edward Jones Dome, home of the Super Bowl XXXIV Champion St. Louis Rams,[1] needs to be renovated, and it’s not hard to see why. The sightlines are terrible, the seats are cramped, the scoreboard is tiny, the sound system vacillates between inaudible and jumbo jet exhaust, and the ambient light is practically non-existent. The Edward Jones Dome is like the cave you visited that one time as an elementary schooler, except there’s beer and you paid $200 to get in. Unfortunately for the denizens of St. Louis, they might be on the hook for a lot more than a new scoreboard. Read the rest of this entry »

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